welcome to my spectrum.
welcome to my spectrum.
+
4 and 3 and 2 and 1 and when I’m on the mic the suckers run.
+
mackenzieart:

Sketchbook Page, Pencil, Pen, and Acrylic on Paper
+
I love this girl.
+
l i g h t .
+
f i r e .
+
+
paddyjohnson:

A caterpillar that has nothing to do with art. I like it. 
+
storyboard:

Documenting Disappearing London
I pass these stores every day. I pass hundreds every week, maybe thousands each month. It’s rare that I look for longer than I need. But Emily Webber sees them.
Based in Hackney, Emily shoots images of the urban furniture of 21st-century London. Her photos show chicken shops and nail bars; laundromats, kebab shops, hairdressers, cab offices, newsagents, and thrift stores all feature. In an increasingly chainified city, she zeroes in on the beauty and originality of the garish and the mundane. On London Shop Fronts, she has published over 1,200 images so far, running one every morning for almost four years.
Read More
storyboard:

Documenting Disappearing London
I pass these stores every day. I pass hundreds every week, maybe thousands each month. It’s rare that I look for longer than I need. But Emily Webber sees them.
Based in Hackney, Emily shoots images of the urban furniture of 21st-century London. Her photos show chicken shops and nail bars; laundromats, kebab shops, hairdressers, cab offices, newsagents, and thrift stores all feature. In an increasingly chainified city, she zeroes in on the beauty and originality of the garish and the mundane. On London Shop Fronts, she has published over 1,200 images so far, running one every morning for almost four years.
Read More
storyboard:

Documenting Disappearing London
I pass these stores every day. I pass hundreds every week, maybe thousands each month. It’s rare that I look for longer than I need. But Emily Webber sees them.
Based in Hackney, Emily shoots images of the urban furniture of 21st-century London. Her photos show chicken shops and nail bars; laundromats, kebab shops, hairdressers, cab offices, newsagents, and thrift stores all feature. In an increasingly chainified city, she zeroes in on the beauty and originality of the garish and the mundane. On London Shop Fronts, she has published over 1,200 images so far, running one every morning for almost four years.
Read More
storyboard:

Documenting Disappearing London
I pass these stores every day. I pass hundreds every week, maybe thousands each month. It’s rare that I look for longer than I need. But Emily Webber sees them.
Based in Hackney, Emily shoots images of the urban furniture of 21st-century London. Her photos show chicken shops and nail bars; laundromats, kebab shops, hairdressers, cab offices, newsagents, and thrift stores all feature. In an increasingly chainified city, she zeroes in on the beauty and originality of the garish and the mundane. On London Shop Fronts, she has published over 1,200 images so far, running one every morning for almost four years.
Read More
storyboard:

Documenting Disappearing London
I pass these stores every day. I pass hundreds every week, maybe thousands each month. It’s rare that I look for longer than I need. But Emily Webber sees them.
Based in Hackney, Emily shoots images of the urban furniture of 21st-century London. Her photos show chicken shops and nail bars; laundromats, kebab shops, hairdressers, cab offices, newsagents, and thrift stores all feature. In an increasingly chainified city, she zeroes in on the beauty and originality of the garish and the mundane. On London Shop Fronts, she has published over 1,200 images so far, running one every morning for almost four years.
Read More
+
thisishangingrockcomics:

i did this rework of a suuuper old comic for a company that never ended up using it for anything!!!
+
sciencecenter:

NASA probe allows for visualization of solar storms
You’re looking at a computer simulation of a solar cyclone, constructed using data from the orbiting Solar Dynamics Observatory and a Swedish-based solar telescope. The cyclone is composed of plasma swirling among the solar magnetic fields. 

These solar cyclones may help to answer a question that scientists had long wondered about: why is the sun’s atmosphere more than 300 times hotter than its surface? Scientists previously thought that the heat came from the surface of the sun, but how it traveled to the surface was unclear. Now, researchers think that these solar storms, as many as 11,000 at once, funnel heat from the sun’s surface to the corona, as they reported in Nature.